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Guaranteed Livable Income is a Feminist Issue

Poverty is a feminist issue. The vast majority of the world's poor are women and girls who also carry the burden of underpaid and unpaid care work. Economic insecurity prevents women from leaving abusive men (husbands, fathers, adult sons, employers). Subject to colonialist and imperialist forces, Indigenous women and women of colour face the interlocking impacts of sexism and racism. From the first day of our lives, we are rendered vulnerable to exploitation of our labour and our bodies.


This panel discusses the potential for a Guaranteed Livable Income (GLI, also referred to as Basic Income) to improve the ability of the poor, racialized, and sexualized to live our lives with more freedom and to participate meaningfully in shaping civil society and our shared future. We will examine how feminists might shape GLI policies to benefit women. We will discuss how feminists can address the strengths and pitfalls of pilot programs and various GLI models being tried or proposed in different parts of the world.

Come along to this Feminist Forum for an evening of discussion with local and international feminists.


Sarah M Mah is a member of the Asian Women for Equality, a grassroots feminist group that works as a progressive force to change societal attitudes towards women, especially women of Asian descent, and create opportunities for Asian women to have meaningful participation and take leadership roles in civil society. She is currently a PhD candidate at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.


Amanda Young is the CEO of the First Nations Foundation, an Indigenous financial skills charity in Australia. She is a lawyer and social entrepreneur who has worked in the Indigenous space for many years from criminal law, Indigenous business and financial services. Amanda is passionate about big change which shifts the dial towards Indigenous prosperity and she means to do just that.



All those interested in feminist ideas are welcome

Enquiries & RSVPs: info@catwa.org.au

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